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Get the Most out of Your Meals

Hey guys, it’s Coach AB here. I’m here to tell you how to get the most out of your meals or make your food work better for you. The main focus is how we can help get digestion started and the most nutrients out of the food you’re intaking.  With many of these tips, I want you to remember we’re trying to get you into a parasympathetic state versus a sympathetic state.  Sympathetic is fight or flight – which means that the food you’re eating is going right through you with the least amount of absorption possible.  The …

Glute VMO Activation

Today we’re going to go a bit more in-depth on a move we use here all the time. This move helps people warm up for squats; it’s part of a glute activation warm-up that we got from Chris Duffin over at Kabuki labs.  Here’s what you’re going to do, you’re going to set up with one knee on the ground and the foot of the other leg off to the side at 90 degrees. I will try to keep that lead leg with the foot on the ground as passive as possible (it’s mainly there for balance).  My …

BMI

Hey everyone, it’s coach AB here from CrossFit Mass. I coach a female athlete who likes to dabble in weightlifting. She recently had a physical, and her physician told her she ranks high on the BMI scale and asked me, “Is that bad?” https://youtu.be/x4Vkc7AFO-s In a society where females are pressured by numbers and it can be hard to talk about – the good news is the world is progressively getting better, but I’m going to make it plain and simple.  Looking at the BMI (Body Mass Index) equation itself, it only takes into account height and weight. …

Fix your Delt Raises with these 3 quick tips

Today, we will go over delt raises, some common problems with them, and how to fix them.  The delt is composed of three anterior, lateral, and posterior muscles, and we tend to refer to and train them in the Front, Side, and Rear planes. Fix your Delt Raises with these 3 quick tips (Sometimes, you’ll hear people refer to the seven delts. Studies have shown that there are seven neuromuscular segments to the deltoid muscle. Three of these lie in the anterior head of the deltoid, one in the anatomical middle head, and three in the anatomical posterior …

Heart Rate Monitor

Alright, what’s up guys? Coach Joe here and we’re back with a question, “what’s the best heart rate monitor that accounts for age?” Well, in regards to that first part about accounts for age, all traditional heart rate monitors actually account for age. The basic calculation is 220 beats per minute, minus your age.   So, for a 45-year-old athlete, the maximum heart rate would be 175 beats per minute. So, typically, you would divide that into five zones. So you’d have training zones one through five, with percentages ranging from 50 to 60% and increasing in 10% …

Maximum Aerobic Function

The Maffetone Method or Maximum Aerobic Function is developed by Dr. Maffetone years ago with the main idea that most runners are overtraining and need to find a more sustainable way to stay in shape. In other words, they would benefit from fewer workouts of higher quality! He was working with athletes, and he was observing them, particularly runners, who were overtraining, meaning they were training at too high an intensity with too much volume, and they were breaking down over time. Working with a heart rate monitor, he would take them to a track and run them …

The one thing you need to keep your back safe

Today we’re going to talk about the hip hinge, how to perform it, why it is important that we do it correctly. And finally, we’re going to give you a drill that we like to use to ensure that we are doing it correctly.  So what is a hip hinge, and why is it important?  If we think about the fundamental movements of the human body, we have upper-body pushing and pulling, and then we have lower body pushing (squat) and pulling (hinge).  With hip hinging being one of those four primary movements, we have to make sure …

Heart Rate Part 2: Heart Rate Reserve

Yesterday we broke down traditional heart rate zones.  They are typically calculated using percentages of 220 minus an athlete’s age (go here to read more). An excellent place to start, but it can be a little too general of a number. Today we’re going to step up our game and include some data that considers the athlete’s current fitness level and recovery status. One way is the Karvonen method. This method uses your ‘resting heart rate’ (RHR) to create a Heart Rate Reserve (HRR), which will then help us refine our training zones.  Heart Rate Reserve is the …

Heart Rate Part 2: Heart Rate Reserve

Yesterday we broke down traditional heart rate zones.  They are typically calculated using percentages of 220 minus an athlete’s age (go here to read more). An excellent place to start, but it can be a little too general of a number. Today we’re going to step up our game and include some data that considers the athlete’s current fitness level and recovery status. One way is the Karvonen method. This method uses your ‘resting heart rate’ (RHR) to create a Heart Rate Reserve (HRR), which will then help us refine our training zones.  Heart Rate Reserve is the …

Best heart rate monitor that accounts for Age? Part 1: Training Zones

Question: What’s the best HRM that accounts for age. Regarding the first part of the question, all traditional heart rate training systems account for age. “Training zones” are determined by subtracting an athlete’s age from 220 beats per minute (BPM) – (220 being a theoretical maximum heart rate) to get an age-adjusted maximum heart rate. The zones then are simply percentages of that age-adjusted maximum. A 45-year-old would have a theoretical max HR of 175 beats per minute. (220-45=175) And their training zones would be as follows. Zone 1 is 50-60% or 88-105 bpm Zone 2 is 60-70%, …

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Have a burning question about our gym or program? Want to know if CrossFit Mass is right for you? Send us an email to info@crossfitmass.com or give us a call at 978-494-0606.

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Take the first step towards getting the results you want!

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Want to know if CrossFit Mass is right for you?

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 or give us a call at 978-494-0606.

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Have a burning question about our gym or program? 
Want to know if CrossFit Mass is right for you?
Send us an email to info@crossfitmass.com
 or give us a call at 978-494-0606.